Tomb of Annihilation – Session 13


I’m not going to do a room by room breakdown of the exploration, but there will still be spoilers for the Tomb of Nine Gods section of Tomb of Annihilation.

Our intrepid explorers took a moment to regard the gaping devil mouth at the end of the overgrown, obviously trapped corridor before them. While they contemplated their actions, the first puzzle door behind them began to close. Sobek tossed the Immovable Rod to Herrick who sprinted to lock the door in place. The heavy stone door ground to a stop. The inner door began to close. Unwilling to abandon their exploration of the tomb, they quickly chose to grab the Immovable Rod and allow themselves to be trapped within.

Artist: Erol Otus

Once they were in, they took quick stock of their surroundings and Herrick examined the gaping devil’s mouth. No light or darkvision penetrated the darkness within the mouth, yet a simple stick entered with no resistance. They left the mystery behind, choose to NOT jump in or otherwise stick body parts in the hole. They took note of a floor grate that revealed a flowing river below, but chose to leave it undisturbed as well.

A crystal window at the end of the corridor revealed a tomb-like chamber to them, though they saw no immediate means of ingress. They continued to explore the tomb rather than try to break through the crystal window. They found a route that appeared to double back around and lead toward the tomb with the crystal window.

Along the way, they found a room with an oddly magnetic statue that drew all metal to it, destroying Herrick’s rapier before Sobek pinned a cloak over the offending part of the statue. While the magnetism still drew metal to it, with a barrier in between it and the objects, it could do no more damage.

One challenge followed another and a skeleton with a key-shaped head marched into the room. It moved to attack, but was quickly destroyed by Sobek, who wasted no time using teeth and claws to dismantle the bony thing. They kept its head, however, thinking anything key-shaped in a dungeon full of traps and puzzles must be useful. Soon after, they found the room with the crystal window, and though they were beset by multiple mask-wearing wights, they defeated the undead and found a ring within the sarcophagus. Herrick slipped it on to his finger and a spirit passed into him. The Trickster God, Obo’Laka, possessed the dwarf and began to make a nuisance of herself, though Herrick still maintained control of his faculties. Remember a clue they’d found before entering the tomb, they took the masks from the wights and continued their explorations.

South of the tomb, they found a path down, though explosive gas quickly dissauded them from following that route. They determined it probably only led to the underground river they saw through a floor grate in the first hallway and returned to the tomb, then the statue room.

North of the magnetic statue, they found a magic fountain. Despite Obo’Laka’s warnings, Rayla and Baersora drank from the fountain. Its magic altered both of their bodies into males. Drinking again, they reverted back to their original female bodies*. They decided to take a moment to rest before pressing onward…

Not a bad first night in the Tomb of Nine Gods. I though using the statue’s magnetism to pin a cloak over the destructive element was a pretty clever way of dealing with that particular challenge. Anyone who thought the Tomb of Nine Gods was going to be a simple re-tread of the Tomb of Horrors should know better now, since the original adventure didn’t have nearly as many combat encounters (and usually killed people in the first corridor… though having a Passive Perception upwards of 21+ makes most traps really obvious even if the characters aren’t actively searching for them).

* As unlikely as it seems, I rolled the exact same result on the random table FOUR time in a row. I’m really souring on the tetrahedron-shaped d4s…

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